A Gentleman in Moscow, Amor Towles

“In all ways a great novel, a nonstop pleasure brimming with charm, personal wisdom, and philosophic insight. This book more than fulfills the promise of Towles’ stylish debut, Rules of Civility.” – Kirkus Reviews (starred) From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility–a transporting novel about a man who is ordered […]

Some Writer!: The Story of E.B. White, Melissa Sweet

SOME PIG, Charlotte the spider’s praise for Wilbur, is just one fondly remembered snippet from E. B. White s Charlotte s Web. In Some Writer!, the two-time Caldecott Honor winner Melissa Sweet mixes White’s personal letters, photos, and family ephemera with her own exquisite artwork to tell his story, from his birth in 1899 […]

Hero of the Empire, Candice Millard

At age twenty-four, Winston Churchill was utterly convinced it was his destiny to become prime minister of England one day, despite the fact he had just lost his first election campaign for Parliament. He believed that to achieve his goal he must do something spectacular on the battlefield. Despite deliberately putting himself in extreme […]

Hidden Figures, Margot Lee Shetterly

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as human computers used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some […]

The Perfect Horse, Elizabeth Letts

In the chaotic last days of the war a small troop of battle-weary American soldiers captures a German spy and makes an astonishing find, his briefcase is empty but for photos of beautiful white horses that have been stolen and kept on a secret farm behind enemy lines. Hitler has stockpiled the world’s finest […]

Becoming Grandma, Lesley Stahl

From one of the country s most recognizable journalists: How becoming a grandmother transforms a woman s life.
After four decades as a reporter, Lesley Stahl’s most vivid and transformative experience of her life was not covering the White House, interviewing heads of state, or researching stories at “60 Minutes.” It was becoming a grandmother. […]

The Last Days of Night, Graham Moore

New York, 1888. Gas lamps still flicker in the city streets, but the miracle of electric light is in its infancy. The person who controls the means to turn night into day will make history and a vast fortune. A young untested lawyer named Paul Cravath, fresh out of Columbia Law School, takes a […]

Apache Wars, Paul Andrew Hutton

In the tradition of “Empire of the Summer Moon, “a stunningly vivid historical account of the manhunt for Geronimo and the 25-year Apache struggle for their homeland.
They called him Mickey Free. His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides–the Apaches and the white invaders blamed him for it. A mixed-blood […]

New England Bound, Wendy Warren

In a work that fundamentally recasts the history of colonial America, Wendy Warren shows how the institution of slavery was inexorably linked with the first century of English colonization of New England. While most histories of slavery in early America confine themselves to the Southern colonies and the Caribbean, New England Bound forcefully widens […]

Shoe Dog, Phil Knight

“In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed […]